1.23.2008

The Sartorialist at Danziger Projects


After I left my office yesterday, I rushed to the west side to be able to catch the opening of Scott Schuman's, aka The Sartorialist, exhibit at Danziger Projects on West 26th Street before my 6:30pm class a couple of blocks away. Apparently this was a great idea since later that night there was a line around the block of people waiting to get in. I was excited to see it but at the same time I was wondering, will people really want to buy an expensive print of a random stranger in great clothes? Will they care about buying images that they can just see online? But it really wasn't about that at all. What the show conveys at the end, is just an amazing sense of capturing someone's personality and how they interact with the environment and the camera, without thinking about it too much. I don't remember exactly how many prints were in the show, but only a small percent were photographs of fashion people (Agyness, Hamish, Carine, Lynn Yaeger, Stam), which I thought was the best decision; the rest of the photographs stood on their own as wonderful portraits of stylish individuals from around the world.

Let me tell you, seeing the photographs out of a computer screen is another thing entirely (and another reason why Print will never die). The colors and the details stand out in a way almost unimaginable. The photograph of the eccentric woman that I'm showing at the top of this post is beautiful in real life. You can see the pattern on her clothes, the texture, the way the different fabrics play with each other, it was really a treat. Also these photographs really showcase what a great sense of light and composition Scott has, but I guess in the end, that's why he's so successful. Anyone can go out and take pictures of people that are well dressed, but not everyone can take the beautiful photographs that he takes, especially considering that they're taken on the go, on the street, where there's no time for retakes and re-posing or anything like that.

I posted my favorite images from the show above, I recognized a lot of them from the blog (like the redheaded girl on the bike and the eccentric woman), but I didn't remember seeing the one with the couple kissing or the girl with the wind blowing in her head, both truly wonderful photographs when seen up close, with all the details. Since I went so early, I didn't get to see Scott or any other sightings, but I definitely encourage you guys to go and see the show if you are in the city.

For more information go to The Sartorialist, Danziger Projects and The Year in Pictures.

6 comments:

Paul Pincus said...

James Danziger has an amazing eye.

susie_bubble said...

The Sartorialist seems to be able to capture a moment/essence of that person's outfit that makes his photos exceptionally striking...

laia. said...

I agree, but I think it's weird that it really didn't hit me, until I saw the photographs hanging on the wall, taken out of their usual context. I guess that's obviously part of the reason to have a show, but I was so so pleased.

Zara said...

How much were the pieces on sale for? I imagine they'd be snapped up very quickly. Hopefully I can see this exhibition soon :)

Anonymous said...

it's not that prints will ever die--it's a question of format, whether digital or film. despite their existence in print, they are still digital photographs.

laia. said...

Although I see your point, that's not really what I was referring to when I said Print will never die. I meant Print, as in magazines, real things that you can hold in your hand and feel.
Lately people have been constantly announcing the inevitable demise of print, being a lover of magazines, I don't ever think it will die, but I think this show was a perfect example of why. His photographs are on the internet and we can access them anytime and that's great, but when you see them outside of a computer screen you can really appreciate their beauty more.
I can look at fashion photography on the internet all day, but nothing beats turning the page of a magazine and really getting to connect with the image.