4.05.2011

Long, long, long

Maxi skirts are still my total jam. I never knew I would be the kinda girl to wear them all the time but my collection is slowly growing (like, really slowly, I haven't shopped in over 6 months but I guess that's another story). In a way it seems like a natural extension of preferring jeans over skirts my entire life, now I'm trying to dress a little less casual all the time and long skirts give me the freedom to sit down and put my legs up however way I want without flashing people my underwear.

It's cool to see that the rest of the fashion world has also embraced the maxi length. Although we're used to only seeing them for formal occasions, they're now becoming more and more of an everyday piece.


Betty Jackson's
sheer red dress has the perfect Ellen von Unwerth vibes although I think for maximum awesomeness I would wear lil' denim shorts under it and unbutton it all the way to the belly button (from the bottom up). Juan Carlos Obando's Grecian gown is perfectly accessorized with a rope harness and I'm surprised at how much I enjoy the shoulder cutouts that I'm usually totally against. Roksanda Illincic's fluid satin skirt and structured sweater could be prim with different proportions but here everything works out, especially with the witchy hat and sheer black hose.

I'm madly in love with Vera Wang's asymmetric oxblood ruffly gown. I would wear it exactly like that. Please come to me. Also come to me Valentino gowns. I have no occasion to wear you but I don't care. I will find it.




Frothy dresses are cool, but structured pieces really take the hippie vibes away and leave a weirdo aftertaste behind (this is a good thing). I love Ann Sofie Back's beautifully draped pieces with delicate folds and pleats. They are strangely organic in their meticulous quasi-futuristic cleanliness. Limi Feu's majestic voluminous A-line dresses seem oddly appropriate for urban nomads, something about a long white dress with a long red jacket just WORKS (peep the super cool boots as well). Things were a little less conceptual at Maison Martin Margiela this season, but they were pretty much everything I want to be. I can't decide if I like the leather skirt or the felted wool skirt better, my guess is that I'd probably need both, along with the cool sweatshirts and opera-length leather gloves.

7 comments:

Hal said...

I don't think I could ever pull a long, structured skirt off. Just too short. But they're stunning, and Ann S-B can do no wrong.

HALCOHOLIC.com

Hannah said...

agreed. agreed agreed agreed.

with all of this. Edginess was lacking in some of 70's trends. Not necessarily a bad thing, it just depends what your looking for.

I've been looking for the structure, and it's starting to come back around!

The solution is sleek, simple, and slightly severe.


Laia, I always visit your blog because you WRITE. I appreciate your intelligence and wit! SO nice to find that in a blog.

Props.


Hannah
http://heytherekid.blogspot.com

laia. said...

Aw, thank you Hannah!
<3

cole said...

I love your blog, how gorgeous!
XOXO Nicole, VPV Team Member
Check us out & follow @ http://www.vantagepointvintage.com/blog/

Susie said...

This post bring up an important point: is the long skirt everyday wearable?

I love the look worn casually, too, but sometimes the ankle-and-below length gets in the way. Foot coverage can be a bit much for daily wear, in my own experience.

The last few inches make all the difference to me, so the gray Limi Feu dress seems the most perfect and wearable. Not to mention it would give you a magically awesome presence instantly upon wearing.

Thank for making me think about what looks great versus what I end up actually wearing. I think I just realized my preference in terms of longer skirt lengths :)

Claire said...

I've been really really in love with long skirts since about fall, and I have yet to find any nice ones! Maybe I've just been unlucky? But really they are fantastic, I don't think I've seen a blogger pull them off as wonderfully as you do. <3

Ruby said...

nice blog

http://www.thelookbook.info/